Posts by reflet

Revue de presse – Mars/Avril 2017

Posted by on April 7, 2017 in Uncategorized @en | No Comments

Revue de presse pour mars-avril 2017   Le gouvernement ontarien investit 5,4 millions $ dans les technologies de la santé http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1025948/gouvernement-5-4-millions-technologies-de-lasante   Prendre rendez-vous avec un médecin de famille sur Internet http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1026128/prendre-rendez-vous-medecin-famille-interneten-ligne-acces-services-sante     Where you live in Ontario could determine your risk of a heart attack, study finds https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/04/03/where-you-live-in-ontario-could-determinerisk-of-cardiac-event-study.html   et le reportage de Radio-Canada sur le même sujet ici : http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1025738/les-residents-du-nord-de-lontario-plus-a-risquede-problemes-cardiaques   Aide médicale à mourir : des médecins ontariens demandent plus de protection http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1025385/aide-medicale-a-mourir-des-medecins-ontariensdemandent-plus-de-protection   Les négociations entre les médecins et la province reprennent http://www5.tfo.org/onfr/les-negociations-entre-les-medecins-et-la-province-reprennent/   Un outil en français pour favoriser la santé mentale des employés http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1024601/sante-mentale-travail-employes-employeurssoutienbienetre   Les temps d’attente en santé s’améliorent, mais les inégalités régionales persistent http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1024718/temps-attente-delais-sante-canada-cataractehanche-genou   Pas de réduction d’électricité pour les hôpitaux ontariens http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1024012/pas-de-reduction-electricite-pour-hopitauxontariens   Vivre en français à Toronto : témoignages et enjeux http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/ya_pas_deux_matins_pareils/2015- 2016/chronique.asp?idChronique=4319036   Conseil consultatif des patients et des familles http://health.gov.on.ca/fr/public/programs/pfac/default.aspx     L’Hôpital Montfort 20 ans plus tard : soins, savoir et formation en français http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1023401/sos-montfort-centre-formation-sante-francaisheritage-innovation   Should the wealthy be allowed to buy their way to faster health care at private clinics? https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/03/18/should-the-wealthy-be-allowed-to-buytheir-way-to-faster-care-at-private-clinics.html   Sciences infirmières: «Pourquoi étudier en français?» http://www5.tfo.org/onfr/sciences-infirmieres-pourquoi-etudier-en-francais/   Why your doctor may soon go on strike https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2017/03/09/why-your-doctor-may-soon-goon-strike-hepburn.html   Transferts en santé : 4,2 milliards de plus pour l’Ontario http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1021598/transferts-en-sante-4-2-milliards-de-plus-pourlontario   Trying to ‘change the culture of medicine’ by letting patients decide what gets researched http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/patients-involved-in-all-aspects-of-medical-research- 1.4016312   Vers un divorce entre les libéraux et les Franco-Ontariens? http://www5.tfo.org/onfr/vers-un-divorce-entre-les-liberaux-et-les-franco-ontariens/   Nouvelle ressource pour mieux fournir des soins de santé en français http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1021208/soins-de-sante-en-francais   Health-care workers face ‘epidemic of violence’ https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/03/13/health-care-workers-face-epidemic-ofviolence.html   Les soins en santé mentale seraient un investissement rentable et responsable http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/sante/201703/07/01-5076341-les-soins-en-sante-mentaleseraient-un-investissement-rentable-et-responsable.php   Les services de santé mentale en français sont-ils adéquats dans les universités? http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1022723/les-services-de-sante-mentale-en-francais-sontils-adequats-dans-les-universites...

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Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus

Posted by on January 26, 2017 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus

Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus Positive spaces are welcoming spaces for people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. At Reflet Salvéo, we work to ensure that our organization is a “positive space”. We aspire to make Reflet Salvéo a space in which transgender, transsexual people, as well as gay, lesbian, bisexual and asexual people and their allies feel not only at ease but accepted as they are. Although we are working towards this goal, I have no doubt we have reached it. We are working to be a “positive space” because it is an ongoing process. This work never really comes to an end. We want to put in place an approach that can survive any turnover of staff, including the periodic arrival of students, some of whom have not been sensitized to the subject yet. It is also continuing work on ourselves, both of a social and intimate nature. Social, because it is with individual attitudes that one has an impact on a group attitude. It is when you refrain from cracking a transphobic joke, when you get interested and take time to research, or when you are not afraid to be vocal that you can positively change the atmosphere.   And it’s intimate work as well, because our prejudices are deeply rooted within us, sometimes inherited from our family or from our cultural and social background. So, fighting those prejudices can be a struggle on a very intimate level, a daily struggle that can change us forever. Active offer of health services in French responds to a very different situation. Linguistic identity is obviously distinct from gender identity or sexual orientation. I’m not suggesting here the comparison of several minorities and prejudices. Discrimination faced by Francophones living as a minority and LGBTQ people is not the same. That said, often, these discriminations are articulated. You can be gay AND francophone, Trans AND francophone, and be discriminated as a gay francophone, or a Trans francophone. Actively offering health services in French, and setting up a positive space do have a similar matrix and require a similar solicitude. Solicitude is a virtue we don’t hear a lot about, and that’s unfortunate, in my view. Solicitude goes beyond mere tolerance and beyond acceptance. It includes these two notions but with a strong dose of empathy. Solicitude is the considerate care that one has for someone. It is what drives our need for positive spaces and active offer. By putting in place one or the other, or better, both, we want the same for the clients: that they feel welcomed, accepted, as they are, in all their complexity and differences, that they do not hesitate to express their orientation, their identities, in their own...

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Population Health Approach: A Promising Direction for Franco-Ontarians and Other Communities

Posted by on November 21, 2016 in blog-en | No Comments

Population Health Approach: A Promising Direction for Franco-Ontarians and Other Communities

  Population Health Approach: A Promising Direction for Franco-Ontarians and Other Communities     As a Franco-Ontarian, I enthusiastically embrace the ‘new’ population health approach to health planning in Ontario, as put forward in the Patients First discussion document which is now translated into proposed legislation.   I believe this approach to be quite promising for a minority community like Francophones in Ontario.   First, a population health approach recognizes that people’s health outcomes are influenced by a number of factors, including their social links to community. In the case of Franco-Ontarians, we often have to work hard to find and remain in touch with our community, including its language and culture. There are a range of issues that arise when Francophones are unable to connect with their community or receive services in their language.   Secondly, a population health approach supports the idea that improved health outcomes for a given population require strategic investments in key areas.   It was therefore very interesting to read, in a recent blog posting on Health Affairs, that health service providers are encouraged to play a role in health – not just health care but health outcomes. Furthermore, this role might not locate the service provider in the centre (as the hub of its community) but rather as an important support (a “spoke”). This is very exciting and rich with possibilities!   I think a health service provider (such as a hospital) can and likely already frequently does play a “spoke” role for many communities, usually those that are geographically-based. I think the potential exists for a health service provider to play a key role for a linguistic and cultural community such as Franco-Ontarians if it were to develop and nurture mechanisms by which it can establish links with that community.   Reflet Salvéo is keen on sharing ways that health service providers can play that role, whether it’s through active offer or hiring bilingual human resources. Together, we can help ensure that a population health approach improves outcomes for Franco-Ontarians as well as many other communities. After all, once a model has been fine-tuned for Francophones, why not use it for others?    ...

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Improving the experience of providers

Posted by on October 25, 2016 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Improving the experience of providers

Improving the experience of providers   I recently read a blog by Joshua Tepper, a family physician and President and Chief Executive Officer of Health Quality Ontario. In his text (found here http://cmajblogs.com/the-forgotten-fourth-aim-of-quality-improvement-in-health-care-improving-the-experience-of-providers/), Dr. Tepper underlined that an important goal of high-quality health services involves improving the experience of our health professionals, in addition to the experience of patients themselves.   At first blush, it could come across as self-interested. A knee-jerk response without thoughtfully digesting the wisdom of his ideas might sound something like this: “Oh, how typical that a highly paid health professional is going to advocate for more attention.” This would be an unfortunate misreading of Dr. Tepper’s point and does a disservice to improving health outcomes for everyone.   After all, doesn’t it make sense that a healthy, happy and competent professional can only serve us better? Furthermore, let’s not forget that health professionals one day can be patients themselves the following day. As I see it, this is not an either/or proposition. We don’t have to choose between creating optimal conditions for health professionals OR generating optimal health results for patients. The two go hand in hand.   Dr. Tepper’s blog also reminded me of something I’ve said a number of times when speaking about the concept of Active Offer with respect to French-language health services (FLHS).   Ideally, when someone asks for, or is offered FLHS, it should create an opportunity for a POSITIVE interaction and a potentially higher degree of satisfaction – on both sides of the counter (or stethoscope). The need for FLHS should not embarrass or prompt any awkwardness by an employee of a health services provider. If a good system is in place (something that Reflet Salvéo can help with!), all should go smoothly. The employee should know what to do, can do it easily and feel good that they’ve helped a client/patient receive better service which will improve health outcomes. Of course, the client/patient requesting or needing FLHS is also pleased and well-served.   Active offer is therefore an example of Dr. Tepper’s suggestion that improving the experience of health professionals goes hand in hand with improved health outcomes for...

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Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we?

Posted by on October 18, 2016 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we?

Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we? – Gilles Marchildon   When I started a blog in French just over a year ago, I didn’t know how it would evolve. Of course, I knew that I wanted to use this tool to speak directly to members of the Francophone community about health, particularly about health services for our community. I also wanted to address the different challenges members of our community face when trying to access health services in French. Now the time is ripe to start a blog in English. As with the French-language blog, I’m unsure of how it will evolve. It’s clear that we need to talk to you, our English-speaking partners, whether you’re a service provider or involved in planning within a LHIN or doing policy work within government. In case you’re not familiar with us, let me start with a general overview of who we are and what we do, presented in a few “W” questions — the time-tested What, When, Where, Who and Why!   What are we? Reflet Salvéo is a “planning entity”, a non-profit community organization established by the community in order to receive a mandate from the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. That mandate is to advise 3 LHINs (Local Health Integration Networks) on French-language health services. We are primarily funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care through the LHINs.   When? We were created in 2011 and more recently (December 2015), the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care renewed our mandate to advise our 3 LHINs for another five years.   Where? Our mandate is to work collaboratively with three of the five LHINs operating in the Greater Toronto Area. They are Toronto Central LHIN, the Mississauga Halton LHIN and the Central West LHIN. Our work also involves networking with the other five entities in Ontario so that best practices can be shared and any relevant policy recommendations can be made at a provincial level.   What does Reflet Salvéo mean? Reflet stands for “reflection” in French. Salvéo is a “Frenchification” of a Latin word, “salvus”, which means “being healthy”. An acute accent was placed on the “e” to provide a French character.   What are our values? RESPECT of human rights for all UNIVERSAL RIGHT to health PRIDE in the diversity of the Francophone community Who is in our team? Our team is composed of dynamic and talented professionals. They are all fully bilingual and engaged in making the world a better place.   Constant Ouapo:  Constant is a Planning Officer, in charge of Primary Care, HIV-AIDS, Active Offer, Equity, and others files. He was a planning executive in the government of Ivory Coast, and a researcher in the USA. He served as board member at Reflet Salvéo and is now volunteering at ACFO-Toronto as secretary. Constant holds a PhD in Agribusiness and an MBA, from the Texas A&M University System. Josée Roy:  Josée is another Planning Officer within our team. She has 10 years of experience in the healthcare system working in long-term care in the physical rehabilitation field where she has lead the implementation of different programs. She holds a degree in Kinesiology and is currently doing her Master’s degree in Public Administration. At Reflet Salveo, she leads planning in mental health and addictions as well as health services for seniors and women. Raphaël Lopoukhine:  Prior to joining our team as Communication Coordinator, Raphaël was a journalist and an event planner. Educated in France, he worked as a journalist (newspapers and radio) for 5 years and also coordinated Toronto’s Franco-Pride festival...

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