Must-Read Articles

Active Offer Training 2nd edition

Posted by on March 20, 2018 in Must-Read Articles, Our events | Comments Off on Active Offer Training 2nd edition

Active Offer Training 2nd edition

The second year’s English-language training on active offer of FLS attracted 15 staff from various Health Service Providers In collaboration with the three LHINs’, funding ($166,600) was provided by Toronto Central LHIN to support Reflet Salvéo’s Active Offer Leadership Training. Over two years, this training has supported 41 health service providers through the partnership with Nexus, Collège Boréal, and Centres d’Accueil Héritage. This Leadership Training raised awareness on French language services and was aligned to the principles of equity and linguistically and culturally appropriate to the needs and priorities of Francophones. This training provided an opportunity to identify health service providers with both capacity and health human resources to consider future designation of their services. Over the last two years, more than 30 participants from HSPs in three LHINs have participated. From left to right: Lisa Mudie, Dorotha Azzopardi, Dorothy Rankin, Nazira Jaffer, Amine Hadji and Tharcisse Ntakibirora. Among the learners are executives and decision makers who have the power to profoundly influence the practices of many Healthcare providers, in particular through the hiring Francophone and bilingual staff, and the implementation of innovative strategies and policies. The active offer training is built around 4 modules and lasts 3 days: The first module introduces the French-speaking world as it applies to minorities and describes the stakes involved in this active offer. The second module provides suppliers with tools to evaluate their aptness with regards to this active offer. The third module focuses on cultural and language skills, namely communications and community engagement, necessary for the implementation of this active offer. The last module is a roadmap for the actual implementation of this active offer within their services. Through this training, Reflet Salvéo hopes to inform, build awareness, equip and support service suppliers so that this active offer of healthcare services in French may be realized and the health of Francophones in the GTA may be improved. In total, 24 suppliers have signed up for the first two sessions to be held February 23, March 2 and 9 in the case of the first group of 8 participants, and on February 24, March 3 and 10 in the case of the second group of 16 participants. Reflet Salvéo has engaged the services of Maryse Francella as its project coordinator and specialized consultants. This training is funded par the Toronto-Centre LHIN. Coordination and content production by Reflet Salvéo in partnership with: Centres d’Accueil Héritage, Collège Boréal, Nexus Santé and RIFSSSO. Please consult our active offer training guide : Active Offer Strategic Planning and Implementation Guide for HSPs (Revisé 25 mars 2018) You can download the Active Offer Strategic Planning and Implementation Guide for HPS (revised March 2018).   And our complimentary to guide slides PPT Complimentary to Guide for HSP (revised March 27,...

Read more

Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus

Posted by on January 26, 2017 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus

Positive Spaces and Active Offer: Same Focus Positive spaces are welcoming spaces for people of all sexual orientations and gender identities. At Reflet Salvéo, we work to ensure that our organization is a “positive space”. We aspire to make Reflet Salvéo a space in which transgender, transsexual people, as well as gay, lesbian, bisexual and asexual people and their allies feel not only at ease but accepted as they are. Although we are working towards this goal, I have no doubt we have reached it. We are working to be a “positive space” because it is an ongoing process. This work never really comes to an end. We want to put in place an approach that can survive any turnover of staff, including the periodic arrival of students, some of whom have not been sensitized to the subject yet. It is also continuing work on ourselves, both of a social and intimate nature. Social, because it is with individual attitudes that one has an impact on a group attitude. It is when you refrain from cracking a transphobic joke, when you get interested and take time to research, or when you are not afraid to be vocal that you can positively change the atmosphere.   And it’s intimate work as well, because our prejudices are deeply rooted within us, sometimes inherited from our family or from our cultural and social background. So, fighting those prejudices can be a struggle on a very intimate level, a daily struggle that can change us forever. Active offer of health services in French responds to a very different situation. Linguistic identity is obviously distinct from gender identity or sexual orientation. I’m not suggesting here the comparison of several minorities and prejudices. Discrimination faced by Francophones living as a minority and LGBTQ people is not the same. That said, often, these discriminations are articulated. You can be gay AND francophone, Trans AND francophone, and be discriminated as a gay francophone, or a Trans francophone. Actively offering health services in French, and setting up a positive space do have a similar matrix and require a similar solicitude. Solicitude is a virtue we don’t hear a lot about, and that’s unfortunate, in my view. Solicitude goes beyond mere tolerance and beyond acceptance. It includes these two notions but with a strong dose of empathy. Solicitude is the considerate care that one has for someone. It is what drives our need for positive spaces and active offer. By putting in place one or the other, or better, both, we want the same for the clients: that they feel welcomed, accepted, as they are, in all their complexity and differences, that they do not hesitate to express their orientation, their identities, in their own...

Read more

Improving the experience of providers

Posted by on October 25, 2016 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Improving the experience of providers

Improving the experience of providers   I recently read a blog by Joshua Tepper, a family physician and President and Chief Executive Officer of Health Quality Ontario. In his text (found here http://cmajblogs.com/the-forgotten-fourth-aim-of-quality-improvement-in-health-care-improving-the-experience-of-providers/), Dr. Tepper underlined that an important goal of high-quality health services involves improving the experience of our health professionals, in addition to the experience of patients themselves.   At first blush, it could come across as self-interested. A knee-jerk response without thoughtfully digesting the wisdom of his ideas might sound something like this: “Oh, how typical that a highly paid health professional is going to advocate for more attention.” This would be an unfortunate misreading of Dr. Tepper’s point and does a disservice to improving health outcomes for everyone.   After all, doesn’t it make sense that a healthy, happy and competent professional can only serve us better? Furthermore, let’s not forget that health professionals one day can be patients themselves the following day. As I see it, this is not an either/or proposition. We don’t have to choose between creating optimal conditions for health professionals OR generating optimal health results for patients. The two go hand in hand.   Dr. Tepper’s blog also reminded me of something I’ve said a number of times when speaking about the concept of Active Offer with respect to French-language health services (FLHS).   Ideally, when someone asks for, or is offered FLHS, it should create an opportunity for a POSITIVE interaction and a potentially higher degree of satisfaction – on both sides of the counter (or stethoscope). The need for FLHS should not embarrass or prompt any awkwardness by an employee of a health services provider. If a good system is in place (something that Reflet Salvéo can help with!), all should go smoothly. The employee should know what to do, can do it easily and feel good that they’ve helped a client/patient receive better service which will improve health outcomes. Of course, the client/patient requesting or needing FLHS is also pleased and well-served.   Active offer is therefore an example of Dr. Tepper’s suggestion that improving the experience of health professionals goes hand in hand with improved health outcomes for...

Read more

Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we?

Posted by on October 18, 2016 in blog-en, Must-Read Articles | No Comments

Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we?

Let’s start with the time-tested W questions, shall we? – Gilles Marchildon   When I started a blog in French just over a year ago, I didn’t know how it would evolve. Of course, I knew that I wanted to use this tool to speak directly to members of the Francophone community about health, particularly about health services for our community. I also wanted to address the different challenges members of our community face when trying to access health services in French. Now the time is ripe to start a blog in English. As with the French-language blog, I’m unsure of how it will evolve. It’s clear that we need to talk to you, our English-speaking partners, whether you’re a service provider or involved in planning within a LHIN or doing policy work within government. In case you’re not familiar with us, let me start with a general overview of who we are and what we do, presented in a few “W” questions — the time-tested What, When, Where, Who and Why!   What are we? Reflet Salvéo is a “planning entity”, a non-profit community organization established by the community in order to receive a mandate from the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. That mandate is to advise 3 LHINs (Local Health Integration Networks) on French-language health services. We are primarily funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care through the LHINs.   When? We were created in 2011 and more recently (December 2015), the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care renewed our mandate to advise our 3 LHINs for another five years.   Where? Our mandate is to work collaboratively with three of the five LHINs operating in the Greater Toronto Area. They are Toronto Central LHIN, the Mississauga Halton LHIN and the Central West LHIN. Our work also involves networking with the other five entities in Ontario so that best practices can be shared and any relevant policy recommendations can be made at a provincial level.   What does Reflet Salvéo mean? Reflet stands for “reflection” in French. Salvéo is a “Frenchification” of a Latin word, “salvus”, which means “being healthy”. An acute accent was placed on the “e” to provide a French character.   What are our values? RESPECT of human rights for all UNIVERSAL RIGHT to health PRIDE in the diversity of the Francophone community Who is in our team? Our team is composed of dynamic and talented professionals. They are all fully bilingual and engaged in making the world a better place.   Constant Ouapo:  Constant is a Planning Officer, in charge of Primary Care, HIV-AIDS, Active Offer, Equity, and others files. He was a planning executive in the government of Ivory Coast, and a researcher in the USA. He served as board member at Reflet Salvéo and is now volunteering at ACFO-Toronto as secretary. Constant holds a PhD in Agribusiness and an MBA, from the Texas A&M University System. Josée Roy:  Josée is another Planning Officer within our team. She has 10 years of experience in the healthcare system working in long-term care in the physical rehabilitation field where she has lead the implementation of different programs. She holds a degree in Kinesiology and is currently doing her Master’s degree in Public Administration. At Reflet Salveo, she leads planning in mental health and addictions as well as health services for seniors and women. Raphaël Lopoukhine:  Prior to joining our team as Communication Coordinator, Raphaël was a journalist and an event planner. Educated in France, he worked as a journalist (newspapers and radio) for 5 years and also coordinated Toronto’s Franco-Pride festival...

Read more

News Release Entities and Networks Support Commissioner Boileau’s Recommendations

Posted by on June 8, 2016 in Must-Read Articles, Reflet Salvéo in the Media, Uncategorized @en | No Comments

For Immediate Release   You can find our news release in PDF here.   News Release Entities and Networks Support Commissioner Boileau’s Recommendations     Toronto, June 8, 2016   Ontario’s French Language Health Planning Entities and Health Networks would like to thank and congratulate Ontario’s Commissioner of French Language Services for his annual report, as well as for ihis special report dated May 27 titled ” Active Offer of Services in French: The Cornerstone for Achieving the Objectives of Ontario’s French Language Services Act”.     Ontario’s French Language Health Planning Entities and Health Networks endorse unreservedly the conclusions contained in these two reports. We are particularly enthusiastic with the idea of making Ontario as a whole a designated area. Many Francophones live in non- designated areas, and the lack of services in these regions jeopardizes the safety of Francophone patients. This proposal is in line with the objectives of Bill 210, tabled by the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care on June 2, 2016, “An Act to amend various Acts in the interest of patient-centred care.”     The Commissioner’s special report on active offer builds on targeted efforts by the Networks and Entities to promote the concept of active offer among health services providers. We have supported the latter in engaging in active offer by providing tool kits and workshops that offer simple solutions.     In March 2015, the Entities and Health Networks adopted a common position on active offer of health services in French. We are pleased that the Commissioner noted our expertise in the report’s summary. Active offer of health services in French is the regular and permanent offer of services to the Francophone population. Active offer of services:   respects the principle of equity; aims for a quality of service comparable to that provided in English; is linguistically and culturally appropriate to the needs and priorities of Francophones; and is inherent in the quality of the services provided to people (patients, residents, clients) and an important contributing factor to their     Ontario’s French Language Health Planning Entities and Health Networks  remain ready and willing to work with the Commissioner, the government or any other partner to ensure implementation of active offer where it is needed.   -30-   Ontario’s French Language Health Networks and French Language Health Planning Entities work to improve the health of Ontario’s Francophone communities. Although their spheres of action, accountabilities and funding are different, the Networks and the Entities work together on provincial issues of common interest.                       Contact : Raphaël Lopoukhine Reflet Salvéo Téléphone : 647 345 5502 – ext : 224 rlopoukhine@refletsalveo.ca  ...

Read more